Ravenswood woman Jedda first in family to own home on Bindjareb land

Bindjareb woman Jedda Salmon is excited to have her own home on land that generations of her family have walked on. Photo: Claire Sadler.
Bindjareb woman Jedda Salmon is excited to have her own home on land that generations of her family have walked on. Photo: Claire Sadler.

Bindjareb woman Jedda Salmon will be the first in her family to get out of social housing and own a home thanks to a new home ownership model.

According to the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 32.5 per cent of Indigenous homes are owned compared to 72 per cent of non-Indigenous homes.

In response to this, the Foundation for Indigenous Sustainable Health (FISH) developed the home ownership model to give Indigenous people a chance to own homes in the areas their families are from.

BGC chief executive Daniel Cooper, Jedda Salmon, and FISH chief executive Mark Anderson. Photo: Claire Sadler.

BGC chief executive Daniel Cooper, Jedda Salmon, and FISH chief executive Mark Anderson. Photo: Claire Sadler.

FISH chief executive and Mandurah man Mark Anderson said home ownership was a foundational step to breaking intergenerational cycles of poverty.

"In WA if you're in a social house you can't earn more than $28,000 - if you earn more than that you get kicked out of social housing but to get a deposit for your own house you need to earn more," he said.

"People end up getting trapped in that cycle of poverty and not being able to get out because they don't want to earn over that threshold and lose their house."

Ms Salmon said she had worked hard to be able to afford a home.

She and her family have to do 200 hours of sweat equity (giving labour and time) in the design and construction of the house in Ravenswood, Western Australia to be able to buy the property at 75 per cent of the market value.

The 22-year-old said she was looking forward to owning her own home after sharing a bedroom with three of her seven siblings in social housing for most of her life.

"In social housing you can get kicked out for something small or if you earn too much - owning my own home provides stability," she said.

Jedda Salmon's family is helping her build her first home. Photo: Claire Sadler.

Jedda Salmon's family is helping her build her first home. Photo: Claire Sadler.

She said she was excited to entertain in her new kitchen.

"I'm the entertainer in my family and the person that does Christmas lunches so I'm excited to have my first cook in my kitchen.

"I made it a big kitchen so everyone could fit in there and made sure my living area flows into the kitchen.

"I feel connected to this site like I am continuing my family's story in a modern way."

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BGC helped provide building materials including concrete, roofing, windows, bricks, and doors.

BGC chief executive Daniel Cooper said the company valued opportunities to give support to organisations like FISH.

"Jedda has done a lot of work to buy a home so helping her in a small way feels fantastic," he said.

"Our purpose is to get as many people into their own homes as possible so this was very much in line with what we do."

Ms Salmon's home was FISH's first project in the South West with the organisation hoping to build 50 houses over the next five to eight years.