WA Police introduce electronic traffic infringements

NEW AGE: The new technology allows officers to give infringements via their mobiles. Photo: File Image.
NEW AGE: The new technology allows officers to give infringements via their mobiles. Photo: File Image.

WA Police will say goodbye to carbon copy pads for the first time since the 1970s as they welcome electronic infringements.

Handwritten traffic infringements require officers to manually submit and upload a second copy once they return to their base, which occurs for up to 180,000 notices per year.

This month police will use an electronic traffic infringement application on their personal devices.

The application allows police to retrieve person and vehicle data from their mobiles and fill out infringement forms.

Police minister Paul Papalia said this would increase efficiency for WA officers.

"This is a giant step forward in policing and will result in significant efficiencies.

"It will mean less time spent completing administrative tasks and allow officers to spend more time policing the streets and the community.

"It's hard to imagine in this day and age our police were still using the archaic manual process of handwriting infringements."

The rollout will see Western Australia join other jurisdictions who have introduced electronic infringements such as Victoria, New South Wales, Queensland and Tasmania.

Police and road safety Minister Paul Papalia said this would largely increase efficiency and time for officers.

"This is a giant step forward in policing and will result in significant efficiencies.

"It will mean less time spent completing administrative tasks and allow officers to spend more time policing the streets and the community.

"It's hard to imagine in this day and age our police were still using the archaic manual process of handwriting infringements."