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Coronavirus: How you can help stop the spread of COVID-19

John Hunter Hospital has set up a makeshift triage area. Picture: Jonathan Carroll
John Hunter Hospital has set up a makeshift triage area. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

University of Newcastle expert Dr Craig Dalton's recommendations for stopping the spread of the virus is being used by the US government.

WORKPLACES

No handshaking policy

Promote cough and sneeze etiquette (but focus is on excluding ill staff)

Videoconferencing as default for meetings

Defer large meetings

Enforced sanitisation of hands at entrance

Regular hand sanitation schedule reminders via email

Lunch at desk rather than in lunch room

Gamifying hygiene rules (e.g. to discourage touching face)

Ill people stay at home and ill workers immediately isolated

Hold necessary meetings outside in open air if possible

Staff with ill household contacts should stay at home

Disinfect high-touch surfaces regularly and between users

Work from home where possible and consider staggering of staff where there is no loss of productivity from remote work

Consider opening windows and adjusting air conditioning

Limit food handling and sharing of food in the workplace

Assess staff business travel risks

Enhance hygiene and screening for illness among food preparation (canteen) staff and their close contacts.

Analyse the root cause of crowding events on site and prevent through rescheduling, staggering, cancelling.

SCHOOLS

Supervised sanitisation of hands at entrance and at regular intervals

Defer activities that lead to mixing between classes and years

Promote cough and sneeze etiquette (but focus on excluding ill persons)

Strict stay-at-home policy if ill

Gamifying hygiene rules (e.g. to discourage touching face)

Regular handwashing schedule

Disinfect high-touch surfaces regularly and between users

Outdoor lessons where possible

Consider opening windows and adjusting air-conditioning

Enhance hygiene and screening for illness among food preparation (canteen) staff and their close contacts

Review after-school care arrangements that lead to mixing of children from multiple classes and ages

HOUSEHOLDS

Enhanced hand sanitisation

Gamifying hygiene rules (e.g. to discourage touching face)

Disinfect high-touch surfaces regularly

"Welcome if you are well" signs on front door

Increase ventilation rates in the home by opening windows or adjusting air-conditioning

Promote cough and sneeze etiquette

Households with ill members (in addition to measures above)

Ill household members are given own room if possible and only one person cares for them

The door to the ill persons room is kept closed

Wearing simple surgical/dust masks by both infected persons and other family members caring for the case

Consider extra protection or alternative accommodation for household members over 65 years or with underlying illness

COMMERCIAL, ENTERTAINMENT, TRANSPORT SETTINGS

Sanitisation of hands at building entrance encouraged

Tap and pay preferred to limit handling of money

Disinfect high-touch surfaces regularly

Avoiding crowding through booking and scheduling, online pre-purchasing, limiting attendance numbers

Enhance hygiene and screening for illness among food preparation staff and their close contacts

Enhance airflow and adjust air-conditioning

Public transport workers/taxi/ride share vehicle windows opened where possible

* Dr Craig Dalton is a public health physician and conjoint professor at the University of Newcastle whose COVID-19 guidelines have been adopted by the US government.

CORONAVIRUS SYMPTOMS

Symptoms can range from mild illness to pneumonia. Some people will recover easily, and others may get very sick very quickly. People with coronavirus may experience:

  • Fever
  • Flu-like symptoms such as coughing, sore throat and fatigue
  • Shortness of breath

We have removed our paywall from our stories about the coronavirus. This is a rapidly changing situation, and we need to make sure our readers are as informed as possible.

This story How you can help stop the spread of the coronavirus first appeared on Newcastle Herald.