Reduce, reuse, recycling: City of Mandurah launches campaign to improve waste management locally

Mandurah mayor Rhys Williams and Cleanaway general manager David Williamson. Photo: Caitlyn Rintoul.
Mandurah mayor Rhys Williams and Cleanaway general manager David Williamson. Photo: Caitlyn Rintoul.

Mandurah has been named as one of the top local governments for recycling in the state, and has launched a campaign to become the best.

The contamination rate of recycling bins across local governments in WA sits at about 17 per cent, in Mandurah that statistic is six per cent.

Mandurah mayor Rhys Williams said the statistics reflected on the positive connection locals have with their environment.

City of Mandurah chief executive officer Mark Newman attributed the great results to the long-standing partnership the local government had with waste management company Cleanaway.

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The City of Mandurah campaign comes as the nation has been hit with news of a Chinese ban on importing waste.

The exporting ban means that local governments around Australia have been pushed into a logistical nightmare when it comes to waste management, as they became swamped with their own rubbish.

Cleanaway general manager David Williamson said due to their strict criteria China effectively wasn’t an option of Australia, or even other international markets asking for slightly lower quality recycling waste.

He said it was important for residents to be more mindful of their waste management behaviours in the home.

Mandurah mayor Rhys Williams and Cleanaway general manager David Williamson. Photo: Caitlyn Rintoul.

Mandurah mayor Rhys Williams and Cleanaway general manager David Williamson. Photo: Caitlyn Rintoul.

The campaign will be aimed to bring the six per cent contamination rate down to four per cent.

While a significant difference, Mr Williams said he believed the goal was entirely achievable.

He said Mandurah had been leading the way in terms of recycling behaviours and education for a number of years and that the issue was “front of mind for the community”.

Mr Williams challenged the community to “be bold” and take on the goal of reaching the four per cent mark.

“There’s both a environmental reasons and economic reason why we need to get this down,” he said.

To help fund the changes to waste management locally, the City of Mandurah is looking to introduce a 30 cents a week increase to ratepayers. The increase has yet to be approved by city council.

The campaign will run until August and include community education sessions, challenges and rewards.

Throughout the campaign reduce and reuse education initiatives will also be implemented as a way of curbing the issue.

For more information on recycling visit the City of Mandurah website and check out their latest waste and recycling information.