Mandurah holds annual Gnoonie Cup at David Grays Arena

GNOONIE CUP: Lachy Garlett, Snr Cst Frank Farmer, Curtis Bennell, Snr Sgt Neville Beard and Keionte Kickett, Photo: Supplied.
GNOONIE CUP: Lachy Garlett, Snr Cst Frank Farmer, Curtis Bennell, Snr Sgt Neville Beard and Keionte Kickett, Photo: Supplied.

Mandurah's annual Gnoonie Cup took place again this year at David Gray's Arena.

The carnival, which was founded by the family and friends of four young aboriginal boys who tragically lost their lives in a car accident in 2008, has been running annually for a number of years.

It was designed as a day to celebrate Aboriginal culture and raise awareness about positive life choices.

Community leader and youth worker Barry Lawrence said the day was successful, with every young player involved having a great time.

"It was a really, really good day," Lawrence said.

"We had really good numbers again this year - our young people know when it's on and get involved each year."

Lawrence said the day had become an opportunity to create relationships with different communities.

"We had the opportunity to work with another local government who came down with some young people and form some cross-relationships with other agencies.

"In the last couple of years we've been working with the City of Kwinana for NAIDOC events - this is our second time that we've been able to work with them in terms of events."

Mandurah Police Officer in Charge Senior Sergeant Neville Beard said he was pleased to be able to attend the game and run water out to the players - he even got to have a kick himself.

"Unfortunately due to our other commitments we couldn't get more officers there to get involved in the event," Snr Sgt Beard said.

"But we do take every opportunity to get involved with the community, especially young people so that they feel comfortable and learn to trust police."

Lawrence said the two games of the day were successful and fun for everyone in attendance.

"In terms of the two games we were very successful in that sense, of what we wanted to achieve.

"We wanted to get some positivity and definitely that's always our main aim - enjoyment, coming together and having fun."

He added that the kids also knew the importance of the day and what it stood for.

"They also know why we do it as well - and in terms of their support coming down every year and not avoiding the hard subject, it's good to see that it's increasing and growing over every year.

"We want the day to let young people know there's support people within the community and we also want to recognise young people that were lost as well."