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The Informer: India crisis, Pusey sentenced, Port Arthur anniversary

Relatives stand next to the burning funeral pyres of those who died due to COVID-19 at Ghazipur cremation ground in New Delhi. Picture: Getty Images
Relatives stand next to the burning funeral pyres of those who died due to COVID-19 at Ghazipur cremation ground in New Delhi. Picture: Getty Images

Prime Minister Scott Morrison has promised Australians in India will not be abandoned amid surging coronavirus cases.

There were 323,000 COVID cases recorded in India on Tuesday and almost 3000 deaths.

There are about 9000 Australians and thousands of permanent residents stranded in India, with 650 of those registered with the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade as "vulnerable".

Watching the chaos unfold in India has been devastating for Newcastle woman Meraj Khan.

Ms Khan told the Newcastle Herald a school friend - a mother-of-two - had died of COVID-19 due to a critical shortage of oxygen in the country.

"It is really horrifying," she said.

"My friend presented to hospital, but they just didn't have enough oxygen to help her."

Porsche driver Richard Pusey

Porsche driver Richard Pusey

Back on Australian soil and in Victoria, Richard Pusey has been sentenced to 10-months in jail for his "heartless, cruel and disgraceful" filming of dead and dying police officers after a crash.

But he could be released within days after already spending 296 days in custody.

Pusey had been pulled over for speeding at 149km/h in his Porsche on Melbourne's Eastern Freeway, when a truck driver crashed into the emergency lane on April 22 last year, killing four officers.

The shooter emerged from the Seascape guest house while it was on fire. Picture: The Examiner Archives

The shooter emerged from the Seascape guest house while it was on fire. Picture: The Examiner Archives

Heading further southand today marks 25 years since 35 people were killed during a mass shooting at Port Arthur.

Some of the police officers involved in the devastating operation have shared their raw and traumatic stories from that dark day in April 1996.

In a two-part series, The Examiner speaks with the officer who took the first triple-zero call, members of the special operations group who arrested the shooter after a lengthy siege, the negotiator who spoke directly with the offender during that standoff, and a detective called to the crime scene.

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