MPAC unveils dual name

'Acknowledging First Australians': MPAC Board chairman Andrew Ward, Auntie Elsie Ugle, Matthew Bennell, Mandurah mayor Rhys Williams. Photo: Supplied.
'Acknowledging First Australians': MPAC Board chairman Andrew Ward, Auntie Elsie Ugle, Matthew Bennell, Mandurah mayor Rhys Williams. Photo: Supplied.

Mandurah Performing Arts Centre (MPAC) proudly unveiled their new dual name to recognise and honour First Australians and align themselves with the vision of the City of Mandurah.

Having the traditional Noongar name side by side with the European place name sent a statement of reconciliation as Mandurah continues to recognise the ongoing, strong and cultural connection.

The new name Mandjoogoordap Middar - Warangka Mia means Mandurah Dance-Music Building.

In partnership with Healthway, the event started with a Welcome to Country from Auntie Elsie Ugle, a dance performance from Matthew Bennell, and bush tucker from The Bush Kitchen.

Food was followed by performances from Gina Williams and Phil Wallystack accompanied by the Perth Symphony Orchestra.

MPAC chief executive Marc Missiaen said he was thrilled to be able to support the local Bindjareb community.

"The Board and staff are delighted to announce the dual naming of Mandurah Performing Arts Centre to acknowledge the importance of the First Australians from our community," he said.

"We're thrilled to align our vision with the City of Mandurah through this initiative and we will continue to support our local Bindjareb community through our Indigenous program."

We will continue to support our local Bindjareb community through our Indigenous program.

MPAC chief executive Marc Missiaen

Mandurah mayor Rhys Williams, who also attended the event, said the dual naming ceremony formed part of the City's commitment to acknowledge the Mandjoogoordap Bindjareb Noongars.

"The Mandurah Performing Arts Centre joins a long list of City owned facilities dual named over recent years," he said.

"It is fantastic to see one of our more iconic venues, which attracts thousands of visitors to our City each year receiving its dual name, to form part of Mandurah's state first initiative."

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Announcing the dual names at the City of Mandurah's rebrand launch in 2020, Aboriginal community leader George Walley said dual naming buildings was a restorative process.

"The process to get to this point has been a magnificent one," he said.

"Thousands of years ago our ancestors gave us these names so what we are doing is restorative."