Dodgy drives do damage: Residents raise safety concerns after near misses

OFF THE FAIRWAY: Dawesville resident Josh O'Donnell has raised safety concerns following several close calls with stray golf balls coming from a nearby course. Photo: Claire Sadler.
OFF THE FAIRWAY: Dawesville resident Josh O'Donnell has raised safety concerns following several close calls with stray golf balls coming from a nearby course. Photo: Claire Sadler.

Golf may seem like a less dangerous sport than many others but some Dawesville residents have become increasingly aware of the risks.

Josh O'Donnell, who lives next to The Cut golf course, is one of the residents concerned about safety after narrowly avoiding a number of stray golf balls.

In one instance, a golf ball smashed glass across his living room, and ricocheted off the fly screen and fence. If the incident had happened an hour earlier Mr O'Donnell said he would've been in the golf balls firing line.

"There has been damaged doors, windows, roof tiles, water ingress, and electrical damages," he said.

"One year I had about $10,000 worth of damages alone - I recently had six consecutive days where I had a golf ball in the yard.

"It's not just the financial burden my concern is the safety."

I want to live in my own home with no damages and no one fearing going in the backyard.

Dawesville resident Josh O'Donnell

Mr O'Donnell is not the only one worried as another resident, who wanted to remain anonymous, said golf balls had narrowly missed children in his backyard a number of times.

"We have picked up 86 golf balls off our block within the last 16 months," he said.

"Family and friends don't want to visit with kids during the day because of the possibility that an incoming ball is going to do some severe damage."

The Cut golf course venue manager Steve Drake said he was currently working towards a solution with Mr O'Donnell.

"We are aware of the situation and are currently in discussion with the resident in regards to his property and trying to work with him towards an amicable solution," he said.

"We have taken it on notice, seeking expert advice from our insurance broker in relation to the matter.

"Once we have this advice, we will be able to discuss this further with the resident."

Mr O'Donnell said he hoped a resolution would be made soon before anyone gets hurt.

"The way the golf course has been engineered is that every time a golfer plays a bad shot it is coming into our land especially when there is westerly breezes," he said.

"The forestry or a net or whatever it may be should be hanging back to protect all the houses on this side so if someone does slice a ball it's going to hit the net or forestry not a house.

"I want to live in my own home with no damages and no one fearing going in the backyard."