Mandurah votes against Clive Palmer's high court challenge to open WA border

Mandurah MP David Templeman, Clive Palmer and Dawesville MP Zak Kirkup.
Mandurah MP David Templeman, Clive Palmer and Dawesville MP Zak Kirkup.

Clive Palmer's challenge to WA's tough border stance is set to wrap up in the Federal Court today as Mandurah overwhelmingly votes to keep borders closed.

An overnight poll by Mandurah Mail attracted a whopping 7600 votes with, not surprisingly, 98 per cent of people wanting the border to stay shut.

It's been a long time since something has created such a strong and almost unanimous reaction from the Mandurah community.

The federal government is aiding Queensland billionaire, Palmer, who argues WA's border closure is unconstitutional and damaging trade.

But Premier Mark McGowan says it is necessary to protect citizens and is based on expert health advice - and bar a handful, the people of WA have his support.

The Mail has been inundated with calls, comments and letters calling for the border to stay shut, while Mandurah MP David Templeman says he has been busy fielding the same.

"We've been inundated with people so strongly opposed to the High Court challenge," Mr Templeman said.

"It's appalling that the Liberal Party would be supporting a Queenslander.

"I haven't had response like this for a long, long time, something that has created such a reaction.

"People are so strongly supportive of the Premier and WA government's hard border policy. They do not want to see the border come down."

Mr Templeman has a brother and his young family in Collingwood, Victoria and he said it was "just so sad what's happening over there."

Mandurah MP David Templeman has a brother in Victoria and he doesn't want a similar situation in WA.

Mandurah MP David Templeman has a brother in Victoria and he doesn't want a similar situation in WA.

"It's a recipe for disaster. Our hard border policy has worked. I know there are individual examples of hardships - everyone understands those hardships.

"But we're the envy of everywhere else - why would we allow a Queenslander to destroy that?" Mr Templeman said.

Meanwhile, Dawesville MP Zak Kirkup argues that his Liberal party isn't in fact supporting Palmer but simply upholding the constitution.

"The Liberal Party is not backing any individual in this case," Mr Kirkup argues.

"The High Court expects the Commonwealth government to assist the court with important constitutional matters, in this and every other such instance.

"This misinformation that is being peddled by the McGowan government is a poor attempt to distract West Aussies from the real issue of record unemployment and a failure to plan for post-pandemic recovery."

He made reference to tradie AFL pitch invader Jesse Hayden, who moved from Victoria to work on a major capital works project Mandurah.

"If only Mr Palmer was the wife or girlfriend of a Victorian footballer, then he would've waltzed into WA, along with the other 30,000 the state government has let cross our so called 'hard border'," Mr Kirkup said.

Dawesville MP Zak Kirkup says the state government has already let 30,000 cross WA's so called 'hard border'.

Dawesville MP Zak Kirkup says the state government has already let 30,000 cross WA's so called 'hard border'.

The case continues for a fourth and final day in the Federal Court in Brisbane on Friday before being ultimately decided by the High Court.

Mr McGowan says he expects a judgment will be handed down in September or October.

"It is just so selfish and so irresponsible of Mr Palmer, joined by the Liberal Party, trying to bring down our border," Mr McGowan said on Thursday.

"It's not reflecting the will of the people."

But Scott Morrison says the judgement "could leave Western Australia in a weaker position" if its border closure was found not to be justified by scientific evidence.

"The constitution doesn't provide for unilateral decisions to close borders without there being a proper basis for those decisions. That is our understanding," Mr Morrison said.

Australian Medical Association WA president Andrew Miller said it was "a toss of the coin" as to how the court would view the case.

"We would expect health priorities would be very high on the list," Dr Miller said.

AMA WA president Andrew Miller said he expected health priorities would be very high on the list when the court made its decision.

AMA WA president Andrew Miller said he expected health priorities would be very high on the list when the court made its decision.

"The idea that you can't have control around your border during an unprecedented public health emergency I think will be a difficult one to prosecute."