'Great benefit': Mandurah police and domestic violence workers celebrate second refuge

Pat Thomas refuge chief executive officer Jill Robinson and Mandurah Detective Senior Sergeant Trevor Troy have both celebrated the announcement of a second Peel region refuge. Photos: Carla Hildebrandt.
Pat Thomas refuge chief executive officer Jill Robinson and Mandurah Detective Senior Sergeant Trevor Troy have both celebrated the announcement of a second Peel region refuge. Photos: Carla Hildebrandt.

Both police and domestic violence workers have celebrated the announcement of a second domestic violence refuge for the Peel region, which is set to open in 2021.

The state government announcement in March came after the Mandurah Mail ran a six-month campaign highlighting the issue of domestic violence locally and the desperate need for a new refuge, with more than140 victims being turned away from Peel's only crisis centre.

The second refuge will provide tailored 'therapeutic' support services to domestic violence survivors and women fleeing abusive relationships, with mental health professionals, support workers, alcohol and drug counsellors, and nurses on hand to assist.

Pat Thomas Refuge chief executive Jill Robinson said the new facility and its therapeutic model would be a "great benefit" to the Peel region.

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"We are a short-term crisis centre," she said.

"Having something a bit more long term and looking at the clients' wellbeing will be a great benefit to local families.

"It will also make sure there are supports and networks in place before they leave."

Mandurah Detective Senior Sergeant Trevor Troy said the second refuge could encourage victims to seek help and file police reports.

"We make it a priority each morning to follow up on any domestic incident that has occurred and throw the necessary resources at it.

Mandurah Detective Senior Sergeant Trevor Troy

"Any time that refuges are available, it encourages victims of offending to seek assistance," he said.

"That is always a good thing.

"From there, the victim can be assisted in making a report and providing a statement of evidence so we can investigate and charge perpetrators of domestic violence."

The issue is rife in Mandurah with police responding to eight to 12 domestic violence incidents daily, according to Senior Sergeant Troy.

"Some are verbal and some are more serious," he said.

"We make it a priority each morning to follow up on any domestic incident that has occurred and throw the necessary resources at it.

"Our Family Domestic Violence Unit do a really good job."

If you need help with domestic violence, contact 1800 RESPECT at 1800 737 732 or phone the crisis care family helpline on 08 9223 1111 or 1800 199 008.

In an emergency, phone 000.