Pinjarra man who king hit friend sentenced to six-months prison

A 37-year-old Pinjarra man who pleaded guilty to king hitting his best friend twice, causing his head to hit the pavement, has been sentenced to an immediate six-month prison term. 

Duane Tyson Anderson also pleaded guilty to driving on a life-time licence ban, issued on May 28, 2017, when he appeared in the Mandurah Magistrates Court, on Friday. 

Police prosecutor Nev Palmer told the court the father-of-five was driving the victim and his girlfriend home from a pub, about 9pm, on July 29, 2018.

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Mr Palmer said Anderson began driving dangerously before the victim asked him to stop.

After some arguing, Anderson slammed on the brakes.

Mr Palmer said the victim and his girlfriend exited the car and Anderson sped off, before returning to the scene to punch his friend in the face with a clenched fist, causing him to fall and hit his head on the pavement. 

Anderson's lawyer said her client lost his home in the 2016 Yarloop fires and used the insurance money to fund his methamphetamine addiction.

The victim managed to stand up before Anderson punched him again, causing his head to hit the floor for a second time, and a pool of blood to appear. 

Neighbours woke from the noise and called authorities.

The victim received a fractured cheek bone and bruising to his head and eyes.  

Anderson’s lawyer Clare Hay told the court her client was “devastated” and had planned to commit suicide following the incident. 

Ms Hay said he went to the bush with a rope, alcohol and pills, with a plan to end his life, but returned to “face reality”.

Ms Hay said he went to the bush with a rope, alcohol and pills, with a plan to end his life, but returned to “face reality”. 

She said Anderson lost his home in the 2016 Yarloop fires and used the insurance money to fund his methamphetamine addiction. 

Ms Hay said he had stopped taking drugs but still had alcohol problems and suffered from anxiety and depression. 

Magistrate Anne Longden told the court she accepted Anderson was “horrified” by his behaviour, but his “punishment must fit the crime”. 

Magistrate Longden said she was not prepared to suspend the sentence but reduced the term by 25 per cent, for the early plea of guilty.

Anderson was also fined $1000 for driving without authority to do so.