Friends of Samphire Cove plant much-needed trees in biodiversity hotspot

The Friends of Samphire Cove recently planted, fertilised, watered and mulched in 180 plants into the Samphire Cove Nature Reserve.

Going bush: The Friends of Samphire Cove plant trees in the biodiversity hotspot which serves as a landing for migrating egrets. Photo: Facebook/Mandurah Tree Advocates.

Going bush: The Friends of Samphire Cove plant trees in the biodiversity hotspot which serves as a landing for migrating egrets. Photo: Facebook/Mandurah Tree Advocates.

The trees were planted just north of Egret Point, in an area known as a landing for the iconic birds.

Department of Parks and Wildlife officer Aaron Madgwick said the work brought the area back in line with aims of environmental conservation.

“Being on the fringes of suburbia, there's been a lot of weeds encroaching on the area,” he said.

“So what we've done is clear it back, lay some matting out and replant native vegetation - local species from the area - and now we've started doing some weed control and other things.”

The Samphire Cove reserve, which includes two bird blinds, walkways and information on the native flora and fauna, has been delineated as a class A nature reserve, due to the area’s importance for migrating egrets.

“The whole point is to increase people's experience and interaction with the area,” Mr Madgwick said.

“It’s about trying to get it as close to the condition it was before human intervention.

“Having the fence around it allows us to maintain the area, while the signage tells people why it is being conserved in the way it is.”

The Friends of Samphire Cove meet on the last Sunday of every month at 9am at the reserve, with an open invitation for more members.

“There’s only limited things we can do, so having people who have that passion for conservation in their local area, it’s important,” Mr Madgwick said.