Baby dolphin freed from bonds

Halo is one of at least ten dolphin calves born in summer, but already this calf has faced the harsh realities of estuarine pollution.

Halo was spotted last week swimming in the Peel-Harvey estuary, entangled with cord and fishing line, which drew concern from the community, including the Estuary Guardians.

Their attention was brought to the dolphin when a community member posted a photo of Halo to their page.

As Murdoch Dolphin researcher Krista Nicholson said during a dolphin forum on Monday, long-term entanglement can cause constriction and health problems.

“We collect a lot of rubbish while we’re out… It’s insane what you find,” she said.

The Department of Parks and Wildlife set out to disentangle Halo on Tuesday May 10, with the assistance of the Mandurah Dolphin Rescue, Murdoch University and Mandurah Cruises.

An announcement on their Facebook page confirmed that Halo had successfully been freed, stating: “We have a very relieved baby dolphin swimming around Mandurah Harbour tonight!” 

DPaW reminded locals to take all their fishing gear home with them, and the Estuary Guardians said in a Facebook post: “Don't forget to bring in your rubbish and any other rubbish that you see”.

Entangled marine mammals can be reported on the Wildcare Helpline, on (08) 9474 9055.

Free: Baby dolphin Halo has been freed from entanglement. Photo: Harry and Sally Kirby from Mandurah Dolphin Rescue.

Free: Baby dolphin Halo has been freed from entanglement. Photo: Harry and Sally Kirby from Mandurah Dolphin Rescue.

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